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July 17, 2006

Weekend Round Up 07/17/2006

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There are so many little nuggets to blog about today that I thought perhaps a Weekend Round Up was in order. You’re welcome.

Barry Schwartz gives all you procrastinators another reminder: SES San Jose is almost here so make your preparations accordingly. Barry and his gang will once again offer readers quadruple coverage; however, if you’re looking for an alternative to Barry’s well-informed, years of experience voice, I’ll also be live blogging from the SES floor this year. Heh, heaven help us. It’s my first SES experience, and you’re not going to want to miss it. I guarantee it.

Barry also shows us the newest addition to Google’s SERP – OneBox Google Maps. Doing a search for “rustybrick suffern, ny” brings up a OneBox Google Map that leads you directly to your beloved Barry. I’m assuming they’ll have to limit this one per query, making it invaluable for small businesses and tolerable for those of us who prefer uncluttered search results.

Andy Beal’s Fortune Interactive released the results of a study that found linking and off-page SEO are the factors most important to achieving high organic rankings. The study took the highly competitive keyword “laptop” and analyzed the top 100 results in GYM. What did they discover?

  • Inbound link quality was the most important factor across all three search engines.
  • For inbound links, the reputation of the originating page was more important than the page’s relevance to the keyword “laptop”.
  • For the keyword “laptop”, off-page optimization factors out-weighed any on-page optimization factor.
  • The most important on-page factor for Google was Title-tag keyword density.
  • Web pages that successfully ranked across the engines all had strong values in at least the two most important influential factors for each search engine respectively.

Over at DigitalPoint Forums, an AdSense publisher reports a hacker wormed his way into his account and changed the Google AdSense Publisher ID. The publisher noticed a problem when he logged into his account and saw zero impressions and no revenue for the day. By checking further, he realized someone had changed the Publisher ID in his AdSense code.

One member commented the problem was likely self-induced; the publisher must have given others access to his account and now he was suffering the consequences. That may be true, but the problem at hand now is how does Google resolve such a situation? It would be unfair to simply punish the owner of the Publisher ID listed, as anyone could change the ID to anything (i.e. a totally innocent competitor perhaps). Publishers should be aware of such scams and avoid giving out personal account information at all costs.

Looking for sites to advertise on? InsideAdwords announced Google’s category site selection tool for AdWords, making it brain-dead easy for you to find sites relevant to your products.

India’s Department of Telecommunications mandated local Internet Service Providers block users’ access to listed Web sites. The full list is confidential, but Blogspot.com, Typepad.com and Geocities.com are among the sites known to be blocked to Indian users. The blocking is believed to be associated with recent terror plots inside the country. Regardless, blog enthusiasts are trying to find a way around it.

YouTube announced they are now serving up 100 million videos per day on its site, making them responsible for 60 percent of all videos watched online. Yowsa, they’re like the Google of online video.

Wikipedia has added RSS feeds for its entries. That means if someone updates the Falkor entry I’ll immediately be notified. Last week, I learned Falkor is not an overgrown cocker spaniel (even though it kind of looks like one), but instead a fictional luckdragon from The Neverending Story (right, Susan?). [Yes, Lisa. –SE] And should that ever change, I will be among the first to know. I can sleep better at night.

Lastly, Kerry Madden of the LA Times shows us what can happen when you leave your mother unattended with Google access: She googles you. It’s my worst nightmare. I’m in so much trouble once my mother learns how to google people (i.e. her only daughter). I can picture my father spouting exactly what Kerry’s father tells her horrified mother:

“If you don’t want her to write about you, don’t talk to her, because that’s what writers do. They write down what we say.”

Truer words have never been spoken.

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